July 8, 2009

Dutch Water Pyramids help Indonesia

On the Indonesian island Pomana, two huge Dutch water pyramids will start to provide clean sweet drinking water to the local population this summer. This sustainable invention, a large pyramid shaped silver coloured balloon, 8 metres high and with a diameter of 30 meters is now on board of a ship from Rotterdam on its way to Indonesia. This innovative project is the result of collaboration between consulting and engineering firm MWH together with the producer, Aqua Aero Water Systems and the local NGO Yayasan Dian Desa.

A Water Pyramid to fetch water from the ground

In 2006, the water pyramid project received the innovation award of the World Bank. The installation produces around 1000 litres of clean water per day and requires a minimum of energy: the fan which maintains the pressure in the tent and the water pump run on solar energy. Saline groundwater pumped into the pyramid, evaporates as during the daytime when the temperature in the tent rises up to seventy-five degrees Celsius. Dirt and salt remain on the ground and the clean, sweet water drips along the inside of the canvas in a gutter collection system. The exterior of the tent is also used. When it rains, the water flows from the roof to a gutter into a reservoir where it is stored for drier times.

The project is largely funded by Partners for Water, a governmental program which aims to enforce the international position of the Dutch water sector. The people in Pomona have hardly any water fit for drinking available to them. Currently, they have to purchase additional drinking water from the adjacent island Flores. When the pyramids are there the population of Pomona will have 2000 litres of water per day sourced from their own island. It is a big step towards sustainability of their community.

MWH Consultants provide specialist advice in water, environment and energy sectors delivering successful and sustainable solutions the world over. This includes the Water Pyramids.

Source: European Water News

No comments:

National Geographic POD

Endangered Animal of the Day

Places to See

There was an error in this gadget